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Author Topic: 11/7/2018  (Read 353 times)

CigarBanter

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11/7/2018
« on: November 07, 2018, 12:43:20 AM »

Any hump day deals on the various internet sites that are worth talking about? Join in this discussion and perhaps learn something along the way. Warning: don't proceed if you have thin skin but don't be afraid to post either... And welcome aboard!
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A Friend of Charlie

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Re: 11/7/2018
« Reply #1 on: November 07, 2018, 12:47:43 AM »

Holy shit, I don't think I can do another day of this. If I hadn't already spent so much on the park tickets I might just skip it tomorrow (more realistically, later today).
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LuvTooGolf

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Re: 11/7/2018
« Reply #2 on: November 07, 2018, 06:05:16 AM »

Holy shit, I don't think I can do another day of this. If I hadn't already spent so much on the park tickets I might just skip it tomorrow (more realistically, later today).
Ah, the joy of making family memories!
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Travellin Dave

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Re: 11/7/2018
« Reply #3 on: November 07, 2018, 06:36:15 AM »

Holy shit, I don't think I can do another day of this. If I hadn't already spent so much on the park tickets I might just skip it tomorrow (more realistically, later today).
That's the vacation spirit!
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Travellin Dave

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Re: 11/7/2018
« Reply #4 on: November 07, 2018, 06:37:36 AM »

Just escape over to Epcot.  You can eat and drink your way around the World Showcase with the Food and Wine Festival just wrapping up.
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Travellin Dave

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Re: 11/7/2018
« Reply #5 on: November 07, 2018, 06:39:25 AM »

Off to Boston tomorrow.  Little bonus in staying over the weekend and catching the BC - Clemson game.
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LuvTooGolf

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Re: 11/7/2018
« Reply #6 on: November 07, 2018, 06:43:14 AM »

Off to Boston tomorrow.  Little bonus in staying over the weekend and catching the BC - Clemson game.
It's good to be the king!
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LuvTooGolf

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Re: 11/7/2018
« Reply #7 on: November 07, 2018, 06:43:42 AM »

Just escape over to Epcot.  You can eat and drink your way around the World Showcase with the Food and Wine Festival just wrapping up.
That's the spirit.
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Travellin Dave

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Re: 11/7/2018
« Reply #8 on: November 07, 2018, 06:44:22 AM »

Today is Wednesday, Nov. 7, the 311th day of 2018.

Today’s Highlight in History:

On Nov. 7, 1944, President Franklin D. Roosevelt won an unprecedented fourth term in office, defeating Republican Thomas E. Dewey.

On this date:
In 1862, during the Civil War, President Abraham Lincoln replaced replace Maj. Gen. George B. McClellan as commander of the Army of the Potomac with Maj. Gen. Ambrose Burnside.
In 1874, the Republican Party was symbolized as an elephant in a cartoon drawn by Thomas Nast in Harper’s Weekly.
In 1916, Republican Jeannette Rankin of Montana became the first woman elected to Congress, winning a seat in the U.S. House of Representatives.
In 1917, Russia’s Bolshevik Revolution took place as forces led by Vladimir Ilyich Lenin overthrew the provisional government of Alexander Kerensky.
In 1940, Washington state’s original Tacoma Narrows Bridge, nicknamed “Galloping Gertie,” collapsed into Puget Sound during a windstorm just four months after opening to traffic.
In 1962, Richard M. Nixon, having lost California’s gubernatorial race, held what he called his “last press conference,” telling reporters, “You won’t have Nixon to kick around anymore.”
In 1967, Carl Stokes was elected the first black mayor of a major city — Cleveland, Ohio.
In 1972, President Richard Nixon was re-elected in a landslide over Democrat George McGovern.
In 1973, Congress overrode President Richard Nixon’s veto of the War Powers Act, which limits a chief executive’s power to wage war without congressional approval.
In 1980, actor Steve McQueen died in Ciudad Juarez, Chihuahua, Mexico, at age 50.
In 1991, basketball star Magic Johnson announced that he had tested positive for HIV, and was retiring. (Despite his HIV status, Johnson has been able to sustain himself with medication.)
In 2001, the Bush administration targeted Osama bin Laden’s multi-million-dollar financial networks, closing businesses in four states, detaining U.S. suspects and urging allies to help choke off money supplies in 40 nations.
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Travellin Dave

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Re: 11/7/2018
« Reply #9 on: November 07, 2018, 06:45:46 AM »

Ten years ago: In his first news conference since being elected president, Barack Obama called on Congress to extend unemployment benefits and pass a stimulus bill. The government reported the unemployment rate had soared to 6.5 percent in October 2008, up from 6.1 percent just a month earlier. General Motors Corp. reported a $2.5 billion loss in the third quarter while Ford Motor Co. said it had lost $129 million. A school in Haiti collapsed, killing some 90 people. Mieczyslaw Rakowski, Poland’s last communist-era party chairman and prime minister, died in Warsaw at age 81.

Five years ago: Seeking to calm a growing furor, President Barack Obama told NBC News he was “sorry” Americans were losing health insurance plans that he repeatedly had said they could keep under his health care law, but he stopped short of apologizing for making those promises in the first place. The Food and Drug Administration announced it was requiring the food industry to phase out artery-clogging trans fats. Shares of Twitter went on sale to the public for the first time; by the closing bell, the social network was valued at $31 billion. A Russian spacecraft carrying the Olympic torch and three astronauts docked with the International Space Station ahead of the 2014 Winter Olympics in Sochi.

One year ago: Democrats Ralph Northam in Virginia and Phil Murphy in New Jersey were the winners in their states’ gubernatorial elections. Voters in Maine approved a measure allowing them to join 31 other states in expanding Medicaid under the Affordable Care Act. President Donald Trump arrived in South Korea, saying efforts to curb the North’s nuclear weapons program would be “front and center” of his two-day visit. Former star baseball pitcher Roy Halladay died when the small private plane he was flying crashed into the Gulf of Mexico; the 40-year-old was an eight-time All-Star for the Blue Jays and Phillies. Twitter said it was ending its 140-character limit on tweets, and allowing nearly everyone 280 characters to get their message across.
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Travellin Dave

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Re: 11/7/2018
« Reply #10 on: November 07, 2018, 06:57:17 AM »

Elijah Lovejoy
On November 7, 1837, Elijah Parish Lovejoy was killed by a pro-slavery mob while defending the site of his anti-slavery newspaper The Saint Louis Observer. His death both deeply affected many individuals who opposed slavery and greatly strengthened the cause of abolition.

Lovejoy, who was born on November 9, 1802, in Albion, Maine, decided to seek his fortune in the Midwest after graduating from college. Short on funds, he walked to St. Louis, Missouri, where, over time, he became editor and part-owner of The St. Louis Times. His name appeared in the Times for the first time on August 14, 1830, and for the last time—as editor—on February 18, 1832.

In 1832, caught up in the powerful religious revival movement sweeping the U.S. and its frontier territories, Lovejoy experienced a conversion, which led him to sell his interests in the paper and enroll in Princeton Theological Seminary in New Jersey. Two years later, a group of St. Louis businessmen, who sought to start a newspaper to promote religious and moral education, recruited Lovejoy to return to the city as editor of The St. Louis Observer.
Lovejoy, supported by abolitionist friends such as Edward Beecher (the brother of Harriet Beecher Stowe, author of Uncle Tom’s Cabin), became ever more radical in his anti-slavery editorials. He first supported African recolonization then endorsed gradual emancipation. By 1835, he sanctioned abolition in the District of Columbia, and, by 1837, championed immediate universal emancipation.
Lovejoy’s editorials raised local ire while they increased national circulation. A group of local citizens, including the future Senator Thomas Hart Benton, declared that freedom of speech did not include the right to speak against slavery. As mob violence increased over the issue, Lovejoy, now a husband and father, decided to move his family to Alton, across the Mississippi River in the free state of Illinois.

At the time Elijah Lovejoy moved to Alton it was “a booming town.” Alton had some 2,500 residents and was considered both the rival of St. Louis and a far more important Illinois city than Chicago.
Mobs had destroyed Lovejoy’s presses on a number of occasions, but when a new press arrived in November 1837, the violence escalated. No sooner was the new press offloaded from the steamboat Missouri Fulton than a drunken mob formed and tried to set fire to the warehouse where it was stored. When Lovejoy ran out to push away a would-be-arsonist, he was shot.

Throughout the North and West, membership in anti-slavery societies increased sharply following Lovejoy’s death. Yet officials in Illinois, with one exception, made little comment. Twenty-eight year old State Representative Abraham Lincoln stated publicly:

Let every man remember that to violate the law, is to trample on the blood of his father, and to tear the charter of his own, and his children’s liberty…Let reverence for the laws be breathed by every American mother…in short let it become the political religion of the nation…
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Travellin Dave

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Re: 11/7/2018
« Reply #11 on: November 07, 2018, 06:59:27 AM »

Hawai’i

Hawai`i officially joined the Union as the fiftieth state on August 21, 1959, although voters in the United States Hawaii Territory had ratified a state constitution on November 7, 1950.

The Crossroads of the Pacific, as this group of volcanic islands is often called, was originally inhabited by Polynesians from the Marquesas Islands. In 1778, British explorer Captain James Cook spotted the tropical lands and named them the Sandwich Islands in honor of his patron, the Earl of Sandwich. He returned a year later only to meet his fate there after a deadly confrontation with the native islanders. In 1810, after years of civil war, Kamehameha I unified the Hawaiian islands and laid the foundation for a strong monarchical tradition while also maintaining a deeply rooted belief in the Hawaiian gods. Missionaries from the United States arrived throughout the nineteenth century.

More than eighty years of monarchical rule ended in 1893 when Queen Lili‘uokalani was deposed, after a failed effort to reestablish an eroding monarchical power with a stronger constitutional mandate. The Republic of Hawai’i was established one year later, on July 3, 1894, putting into motion the events that ultimately led to Hawaii’s statehood in 1959.

At the turn of the century, many Americans traveled to the tropical islands. Samuel Clemens, better known by his pen name, Mark Twain, recorded his travels in Roughing It, published in 1891. He and his party climbed the volcano Haleakala in Maui and were awed by the experience:
Presently vagrant white clouds came drifting along, high over the sea and the valley; then they came in couples and groups; then in imposing squadrons; gradually joining their forces, they banked themselves solidly together, a thousand feet under us, and totally shut out land and ocean—not a vestige of anything was left in view but just a little of the rim of the crater, circling away from the pinnacle whereon we sat…Thus banked, motion ceased, and silence reigned. Clear to the horizon, league on league, the snowy floor stretched without a break…There was little conversation, for the impressive scene overawed speech. I felt like the Last Man, neglected of the judgment, and left pinnacled in mid-heaven, a forgotten relic of a vanished world.
Roughing It. Chapter 76. By Mark Twain [Samuel Langhorne Clemens]; Hartford Conn.: American Publishing Company, 1891. p549-50
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A Friend of Charlie

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Re: 11/7/2018
« Reply #12 on: November 07, 2018, 07:02:09 AM »

Just escape over to Epcot.  You can eat and drink your way around the World Showcase with the Food and Wine Festival just wrapping up.
That's today's plan.
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A Friend of Charlie

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Re: 11/7/2018
« Reply #13 on: November 07, 2018, 07:02:57 AM »

Good morning, Dave and Dave.
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LuvTooGolf

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Re: 11/7/2018
« Reply #14 on: November 07, 2018, 07:06:59 AM »

Just escape over to Epcot.  You can eat and drink your way around the World Showcase with the Food and Wine Festival just wrapping up.
That's today's plan.
That'll loosen up your attitude in no time.
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